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Little Citizens, Big Issues

by Shana Bartley
on June 24, 2014

In a our newest policy brief entitled, Attendance Counts from the Start, we describe one of the biggest challenges to closing the achievement gap—chronic absenteeism in early childhood years (or grades). We are thrilled to announce our newest campaign, the School Attendance Initiative, to promote awareness and call on leaders to take action on a serious epidemic affecting the city’s youngest residents.

by HyeSook Chung
on June 20, 2014

Early intervention has a great return on investment socially and economically. It empowers parents by working with them in the primary learning environment, their home, and because so many DC children are born in poverty, they are at an especially high risk for developmental delays, which suggests that current ID rates may be missing many children.

Read highlights below and find our complete PDF version of our testimony here.

by HyeSook Chung
on June 18, 2014

Given the most conversations regarding school boundaries and the value proposition over neighborhood-based schools. I thought it would be worthwhile to re-publish our blog highlighting our recommendation for neighborhood-level data!

For those who missed it the first time around.....it's your lucky day!

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by Shana Bartley
on June 18, 2014

After completing my undergraduate degree, I worked with a youth development organization here in DC. I had the privilege of supporting teen women as they worked to improve their lives and strengthen their communities. These remarkable young women trained as health educators in order to promote healthy behaviors and decision-making skills amongst their peers. Although my role as a health educator required that I spend time training them as a supervisor, I will never forget the valuable lesson my team taught me as a peer.

by HyeSook Chung
on June 9, 2014

The indicators tracked in DC KIDS COUNT Data Book 2.0 represent a mix of traditional KIDS COUNT neighborhood child well-being indicators, such as the number of children living in poverty, but we included a few new indicators normally not tracked, such as child care statistics.

by HyeSook Chung
on June 2, 2014

A central belief of DC KIDS COUNT is that children are deeply affected, in all aspects of their lives, by the conditions in their immediate surroundings. Neighborhoods are where children live, play and learn. As such, neighborhoods are the DC KIDS COUNT Data Book 2.0 unit of analysis. Data used to map the neighborhood clusters, which were developed by the DC Office of Planning, was extracted from the Citywide Data Warehouse Program of the Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO). 

by HyeSook Chung
on June 1, 2014

A Note from Our Executive Director

We are thrilled to announce the launch of the DC KIDS COUNT Data Tool 2.0. The premise for the project in 2012, is that where children live, learn and play deeply affects ALL aspects of their lives.

We asked back then as we do now: what kind of place is DC for children?



by HyeSook Chung
on May 30, 2014

DC children are concentrated in certain areas of the city. Almost 60 percent of children under 18 live in neighborhoods in Northeast and Southeast.

 One-third (35 percent or about 36,500) of DC children under the age of 18 live in six neighborhood clusters:

by HyeSook Chung
on May 27, 2014

In 2012, DC Action for Children, in partnership with DataKind and a group of dedicated pro-bono data scientists, launched an interactive, web-based data tool to take traditional child well-being indicators into the exciting realm of data visualization to spur for collective action on behalf of children.

by HyeSook Chung
on May 27, 2014

DC KIDS COUNT Data Tool 2.0 Reveals Severe Deficits in Neighborhood Assets that Dramatically Limit Children’s Ability to Succeed