safer care delivery xenical process RWU cheap lipitor llipitorhere.com macrophage buy propranolol without prescription cerebrospinal buy lexapro channels undergo lasix spot Library buy zoloft online antenatal breech voltaren without prescription intervention

Policy

DC Action for Children works in partnership with government, advocates and providers to bring positive and lasting change for D.C.’s youngest citizens. We regularly testify before the D.C. Council and when necessary, we will draft legislation backed by evidence and best practices.

Special Hearing on Special Education (B20-723, B20-724 and B20-725)

Early intervention has a great return on investment socially and economically. It empowers parents by working with them in the primary learning environment, their home, and because so many DC children are born in poverty, they are at an especially high risk for developmental delays, which suggests that current ID rates may be missing many children.

Our testimony, focused on the following three themes in review of the three bills we are considering:

  1. Process and Procedures
  2. Expanding Services
  3. Expanding Capacity and Oversight

Read our remarks here.

DC's State Board of Education's Roundtable on Chronic Absenteeism

To deliver on the promise of closing achievement gaps and reducing dropout rates, DC Schools must first make a concerted effort to improve school chronic attendance. By any measure, the school district’s chronic attendance numbers are disappointing. 30 percent were truant, registering 10 or more unexcused absences in 2012-2013. More significantly, 40 percent were chronically absent, meaning they missed 10% or more of school (or 18 or more days in a 180 school year) in excused or unexcused absences.

These absences add up to academic trouble for children of all ages. Chronic absence in kindergarten and 1st grade can leave children unable to read proficiently by the end of third grade, especially children from low-income families. By 6th grade, chronic absenteeism becomes a leading indicator that a child will drop out of high school. By 9th grade, it’s a more powerful predictor of dropout rates than 8th grade test scores.

School districts across the country, including Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Oakland, are among them the school districts focused on reducing chronic absence and improving student achievement. These districts are paying careful attention to data to target resources and identify common barriers to getting to school, building a positive culture of attendance and reaching out to students and families who need additional support. Increasingly, they use poor attendance as signal that a child or a family needs help, rather than as a signal to launch punitive action.

Our testimony focuses on four key recommendations:

1) Take a preventive approach to chronic absenteeism
2) Use sound data
3) Address chronic absenteeism much earlier
4) Examine evidence from other jurisdictions

 Read full testimony here.

 

Budget Hearings (Fiscal Year 2015)

DC Action for Children testified at the budget hearing for the DC Child and Family Services Agency (CFSA). Our testimony focused on the importance of preventative, community-based strategies such as home visiting for reducing instances of child abuse and neglect, and recommended the agency be allowed to continue its progress by reinvesting savings from the reduction in out-of-home placements.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the budget hearing for the Department of Health (DOH). Our testimony focused on the Department of Health Community Health Administration’s Home Visiting Programs for expectant mothers and families with young children, and other important DOH programs to prevent infant mortality and increase children’s access to health services in schools.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the DCPS FY2015 budget hearing about the importance of transparency in of terms of equity for at-risk students to ensure we continue to work to close the achievement gaps and increase reading proficiency and graduation rates.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children submitted public testimony for the OSSE FY2015 budget hearing. Our testimony focused on two very different age groups in whose education OSSE plays a critical role: young children ages birth to five and college-ready DC youth.

Read our remarks here.




Performance Oversight Hearings (Fiscal Year 2013-2014)

DC Action for Children testified at the Performance Oversight hearing for the DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE). Our testimony focused on child care quality, education data, and tracking the achievement gap for children from low-income families.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the DCPS performance hearing about the importance of strong elementary schools, the progress that has been made for Pre-K to 3rd grade students and the need for more high quality Pre-K seats.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the Performance Oversight hearing for the DC Department of Health (DOH). The testimony focused on early childhood home visiting.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the Performance Oversight hearing for the DC Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF). The testimony focused on the importance of Medicaid access for DC children.

Read our remarks here.

2014 Bills

Testimony of Bonnie O’Keefe, Senior Policy Analyst on the Title IX Athletic Equity Act of 2014 before the Committee on Education, Council of the District of Columbia on January 22, 2014.

In this testimony, Senior Policy Analyst Bonnie O’Keefe urges the DC Council to pass the Title IX Athletic Equity Act, which would increase data transparency and require citywide planning to fix the demonstrated gender gap in sports participation among girls in DC. She also shares some of the health and educational benefits of sports participation, including decreasing the percentage of DC children who are overweight or obese.

Read more here!

Special Hearing on Special Education (B20-723, B20-724 and B20-725)

Early intervention has a great return on investment socially and economically. It empowers parents by working with them in the primary learning environment, their home, and because so many DC children are born in poverty, they are at an especially high risk for developmental delays, which suggests that current ID rates may be missing many children.

Our testimony, focused on the following three themes in review of the three bills we are considering:

  1. Process and Procedures
  2. Expanding Services
  3. Expanding Capacity and Oversight

Read our remarks here.

DC's State Board of Education's Roundtable on Chronic Absenteeism

To deliver on the promise of closing achievement gaps and reducing dropout rates, DC Schools must first make a concerted effort to improve school chronic attendance. By any measure, the school district’s chronic attendance numbers are disappointing. 30 percent were truant, registering 10 or more unexcused absences in 2012-2013. More significantly, 40 percent were chronically absent, meaning they missed 10% or more of school (or 18 or more days in a 180 school year) in excused or unexcused absences.

These absences add up to academic trouble for children of all ages. Chronic absence in kindergarten and 1st grade can leave children unable to read proficiently by the end of third grade, especially children from low-income families. By 6th grade, chronic absenteeism becomes a leading indicator that a child will drop out of high school. By 9th grade, it’s a more powerful predictor of dropout rates than 8th grade test scores.

School districts across the country, including Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Oakland, are among them the school districts focused on reducing chronic absence and improving student achievement. These districts are paying careful attention to data to target resources and identify common barriers to getting to school, building a positive culture of attendance and reaching out to students and families who need additional support. Increasingly, they use poor attendance as signal that a child or a family needs help, rather than as a signal to launch punitive action.

Our testimony focuses on four key recommendations:

1) Take a preventive approach to chronic absenteeism
2) Use sound data
3) Address chronic absenteeism much earlier
4) Examine evidence from other jurisdictions

 Read full testimony here.

 

Budget Hearings (Fiscal Year 2015)

DC Action for Children testified at the budget hearing for the DC Child and Family Services Agency (CFSA). Our testimony focused on the importance of preventative, community-based strategies such as home visiting for reducing instances of child abuse and neglect, and recommended the agency be allowed to continue its progress by reinvesting savings from the reduction in out-of-home placements.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the budget hearing for the Department of Health (DOH). Our testimony focused on the Department of Health Community Health Administration’s Home Visiting Programs for expectant mothers and families with young children, and other important DOH programs to prevent infant mortality and increase children’s access to health services in schools.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the DCPS FY2015 budget hearing about the importance of transparency in of terms of equity for at-risk students to ensure we continue to work to close the achievement gaps and increase reading proficiency and graduation rates.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children submitted public testimony for the OSSE FY2015 budget hearing. Our testimony focused on two very different age groups in whose education OSSE plays a critical role: young children ages birth to five and college-ready DC youth.

Read our remarks here.




Performance Oversight Hearings (Fiscal Year 2013-2014)

DC Action for Children testified at the Performance Oversight hearing for the DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE). Our testimony focused on child care quality, education data, and tracking the achievement gap for children from low-income families.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the DCPS performance hearing about the importance of strong elementary schools, the progress that has been made for Pre-K to 3rd grade students and the need for more high quality Pre-K seats.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the Performance Oversight hearing for the DC Department of Health (DOH). The testimony focused on early childhood home visiting.

Read our remarks here.

--

DC Action for Children testified at the Performance Oversight hearing for the DC Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF). The testimony focused on the importance of Medicaid access for DC children.

Read our remarks here.

2014 Bills

Testimony of Bonnie O’Keefe, Senior Policy Analyst on the Title IX Athletic Equity Act of 2014 before the Committee on Education, Council of the District of Columbia on January 22, 2014.

In this testimony, Senior Policy Analyst Bonnie O’Keefe urges the DC Council to pass the Title IX Athletic Equity Act, which would increase data transparency and require citywide planning to fix the demonstrated gender gap in sports participation among girls in DC. She also shares some of the health and educational benefits of sports participation, including decreasing the percentage of DC children who are overweight or obese.

Read more here!

Performance Oversight Hearings (Fiscal Year 2012-2013)

District of Columbia Public Schools

Before the Committee on Education

Council of the District of Columbia

DC Action for Children Public Policy Analyst Bonnie O'Keefe testified at the Performance Oversight hearing for District of Columbia Public Schools. Her testimony focused on two areas of concern for young children, which we hope DCPS leaders will address in the upcoming oversight and budget hearings: population and planning for early care and education, and its connection to third grade proficiency.

Read her remarks here.