Welcome!

DC Action for Children is a nonprofit, nonpartisan child and youth advocacy organization dedicated to using research, data, and a lens toward race equity to break down barriers that stand in the way of all kids reaching their full potential.

DC Action is the home of DC KIDS COUNT, the primary source for data on conditions and outcomes for kids’ well-being. DC Action's collaborative advocacy campaigns empower young people and all residents to raise their voices to create change.


What's New?


A campaign worth noticing

How can we reduce poverty, school failure, child abuse and neglect, crime, violence and increase workforce preparation, all while saving the city money? Preventing teen pregnancy has an effect on all of these areas, and the D.C. City Council is taking notice. In a joint press conference with our partner, the DC Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, several councilmembers spoke...

We can all learn - and we can all teach

Tomorrow will mark my fourth week participating in the Anacostia Public Service Program (APSP) at Anacostia Senior High School in Southeast DC. The Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at The George Washington University has partnered with the high school for more than twenty years to build tutoring and mentoring relationships and to promote community engagement. While a...

Reflections of Our Luncheon

Exactly two years ago, I joined DC Action for Children leaders in our community to make a difference in the lives our children. DC Action has a rich history of serving as a voice for children and youth who, otherwise, would likely have no voice. I learned so much more during our October luncheon benefit, but most importantly: how in...

A look into public charter school success: Achievement Prep

“What’s the secret sauce?” asked one member of the group after we toured Achievement Preparatory Academy. At Achievement Prep, a public charter school serving 200 students in Ward 8, test scores are among the best in the city although the students are among the most disadvantaged. They are closing the achievement gap, turning the students who come to them 2-4...

A Renewed Focus on Youth

The goal: 90% of youth will earn a post-secondary degree and have a full-time job by age 24. This seems like a natural expectation, and I think most people would say that we can do even better, because our city’s young people deserve that opportunity. But it’s far from the current situation in D.C., where it’s an uphill battle for...

Early Childhood Education: Invest Now, Save Later

Even with deep concern about the economy and budget deficits that can’t be ignored, we still need to think about making smart investments now. One of the more important lessons I recall from my childhood is how to be smart with money. My father would say, “Being smart with your money today will benefit you tomorrow.” PNC’s Grow Up Great...

New D.C. campaign stresses importance of early intervention

D.C. is reaching out to support some of our youngest, most vulnerable residents--children under three who have developmental delays. Today the Office of the State Superintendent of Education announced the kickoff of the Strong Start Campaign, to increase awareness of early intervention and provide a starting point for parents whose babies or toddlers may have a developmental delay. Expect to...

More worrying than the stock market

While the nose-diving stock market may be monopolizing headlines today, I urge you to focus on another set of numbers that has deep implications for us all. According new Census data released yesterday, child poverty continues to rise in the District.Nearly one-third, or 30.4 percent, of D.C. children live under the poverty line. That’s nearly 8 percentage points higher than...

Reflections on the poverty numbers

On Tuesday the Census bureau released staggering new numbers revealing the depth of poverty in the country. One in five American children now live under the poverty line. In the District, of course, the depths are much deeper. One in three of our children live in poverty. In 2010, about 121,000 people were at or below the poverty line in...

Visit our DC KIDS COUNT Data Center

 

 

We need you.

Let's work together to break down structural barriers that stand in the way of all kids reaching their full potential.  Join Us!